Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2017, Article ID 8397469, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8397469
Research Article

Charting Availability of Processed and Unprocessed Foods in School Neighbourhood Nutrition Environments in an Urban Australian Setting

School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Public Health Building, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to Lisa Schubert; ua.ude.qu.hps@trebuhcs.l

Received 13 December 2016; Accepted 20 March 2017; Published 3 May 2017

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2017 Holly Oaken et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics, “Australian Health Survey: Consumption of Food Groups from the Australian Dietary Guidelines, 2011-12,” http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4364.0.55.012~2011-12~Media%20Release~Australians%20failing%20to%20meet%20dietary%20guidelines%20(Media%20Release)~18 2016.
  2. L. Wellard, C. Glasson, and K. Chapman, “Fries or a fruit bag? Investigating the nutritional composition of fast food children's meals,” Appetite, vol. 58, no. 1, pp. 105–110, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. Lee, “The role of local food availability in explaining obesity risk among young school-aged children,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 74, no. 8, pp. 1193–1203, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. Beaulac, E. Kristjansson, and S. Cummins, “A systematic review of food deserts, 1966–2007,” Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 6, no. 3, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  5. N. I. Larson, M. T. Story, and M. C. Nelson, “Neighborhood environment—Disparities in access to healthy foods in the U.S.,” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 74–81, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. T. Andreyeva, I. R. Kelly, and J. L. Harris, “Exposure to food advertising on television: associations with children’s fast food and soft drink consumption and obesity,” Economics and Human Biology, vol. 9, pp. 221–233, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  7. B. Swinburn, G. Sacks, T. Lobstein et al., “The "Sydney Principles" for reducing the commercial promotion of foods and beverages to children,” Public Health Nutrition, vol. 11, no. 9, pp. 881–886, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. J. L. Harris, J. L. Pomeranz, T. Lobstein, and K. D. Brownell, “A crisis in the marketplace: how food marketing contributes to childhood obesity and what can be done,” Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 30, pp. 211–225, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. E. S. Moore, “Perspectives on food marketing and childhood obesity: introduction to the special section,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 157–161, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. K. Glanz, J. F. Sallis, B. E. Saelens, and L. D. Frank, “Healthy nutrition environments: concepts and measures,” American Journal of Health Promotion, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 330–333, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. B. Austin, S. J. Melly, B. N. Sanchez, A. Patel, S. Buka, and S. L. Gortmaker, “Clustering of fast-food restaurants around schools: a novel application of spatial statistics to the study of food environments,” American Journal of Public Health, vol. 95, no. 9, pp. 1575–1581, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. Ellaway, L. Macdonald, K. Lamb, L. Thornton, P. Day, and J. Pearce, “Do obesity-promoting food environments cluster around socially disadvantaged schools in Glasgow, Scotland?” Health & Place, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 1335–1340, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. H. Nixon and L. Doud, “Do fast food restaurants cluster around high schools? A geospatial analysis of proximity of fast food restaurants to high schools and the connection to childhood obesity rates,” Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 181–194, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  14. P. A. Simon, D. Kwan, A. Angelescu, M. Shih, and J. E. Fielding, “Proximity of fast food restaurants to schools: do neighborhood income and type of school matter?” Preventive Medicine, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 284–288, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. B. Davis and C. Carpenter, “Proximity of fast-food restaurants to schools and adolescent obesity,” American Journal of Public Health, vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 505–510, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. A. Gilliland, C. Y. Rangel, M. A. Healy, and et al., “Linking childhood obesity to the built environment: a multi-level analysis of home and school neighbourhood factors associated with body mass index,” Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. S15–S21, 2012. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. P. H. Howard, M. Fitzpatrick, and B. Fulfrost, “Proximity of food retailers to schools and rates of overweight ninth grade students: an ecological study in California,” BMC Public Health, vol. 11, article 68, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. E. M. Clark, R. Quigg, J. E. Wong, R. Richards, K. E. Black, and P. M. L. Skidmore, “Is the food environment surrounding schools associated with the diet quality of adolescents in Otago, New Zealand?” Health and Place, vol. 30, pp. 78–85, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. He, P. Tucker, J. Gilliland, J. D. Irwin, K. Larsen, and P. Hess, “The influence of local food environments on adolescents' food purchasing behaviors,” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1458–1471, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. He, P. Tucker, J. D. Irwin, J. Gilliland, K. Larsen, and P. Hess, “Obesogenic neighbourhoods: the impact of neighbourhood restaurants and convenience stores on adolescents' food consumption behaviours,” Public Health Nutrition, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. 2331–2339, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. A. Van Hulst, T. A. Barnett, L. Gauvin, and et al., “Associations between children's diets and features of their residential and school neighbourhood food environments,” Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 103, Supplement 3, pp. S48–S54, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  22. A. Forsyth, M. Wall, N. Larson, M. Story, and D. Neumark-Sztainer, “Do adolescents who live or go to school near fast-food restaurants eat more frequently from fast-food restaurants?” Health & Place, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 1261–1269, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. R. An and R. Sturm, “School and residential neighborhood food environment and diet among California youth,” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 129–135, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. E. Harris, J. W. Blum, M. Bampton et al., “Location of Food Stores Near Schools Does Not Predict the Weight Status of Maine High School Students,” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 274–278, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. V. Shier, R. An, and R. Sturm, “Is there a robust relationship between neighbourhood food environment and childhood obesity in the USA?” Public Health, vol. 126, no. 9, pp. 723–730, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. K. E. Mason, R. J. Bentley, and A. M. Kavanagh, “Fruit and vegetable purchasing and the relative density of healthy and unhealthy food stores: evidence from an Australian multilevel study,” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 231–236, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. A. Timperio, K. Ball, R. Roberts, K. Campbell, N. Andrianopoulos, and D. Crawford, “Children's fruit and vegetable intake: associations with the neighbourhood food environment,” Preventive Medicine, vol. 46, no. 4, pp. 331–335, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. A. F. Timperio, K. Ball, R. Roberts, N. Andrianopoulos, and D. A. Crawford, “Childrens takeaway and fast-food intakes: associations with the neighbourhood food environment,” Public Health Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 1960–1964, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. L. Vaughan, N. Fa'avale, and L. Schubert, Evaluation of the Good Start Program for Maori and Pacific Island Children-Final Report; The University of Queensland, 2015.
  30. T. A. Farley, J. Rice, J. N. Bodor, D. A. Cohen, R. N. Bluthenthal, and D. Rose, “Measuring the food environment: shelf space of fruits, vegetables, and snack foods in stores,” Journal of Urban Health, vol. 86, no. 5, pp. 672–682, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. D. Rose, P. L. Hutchinson, J. N. Bodor et al., “Neighborhood Food Environments and Body Mass Index. The Importance of In-Store Contents,” American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 214–219, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. L. E. Thornton, A. J. Cameron, S. A. McNaughton, and et al., “Does the availability of snack foods in supermarkets vary internationally?” International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, p. 56, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  33. A. Winson, “Bringing political economy into the debate on the obesity epidemic,” Agriculture and Human Values, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 299–312, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. R. C. Curhan, “The effects of merchandising and temporary promotional activities on the sales of fresh fruits and vegetables in supermarkets,” Journal of Marketing Research, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 286–294, 1974. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  35. Queensland Health, Pacific Islander and Maori health program, Queensland Government, https://www.health.qld.gov.au/multicultural/health_workers/pac-island-prog.asp.
  36. Logan City Council, State of the City 2013.
  37. Logan Council City, Community profile. Logan City: SEIFA—disadvantage by small area, 2011 http://profile.id.com.au/logan/seifa-disadvantage-small-area.
  38. M. Héroux, R. J. Iannotti, D. Currie, W. Pickett, and I. Janssen, “The food retail environment in school neighborhoods and its relation to lunchtime eating behaviors in youth from three countries,” Health & Place, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 1240–1247, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. Queensland Government, School Search. Department of Education and Training, https://schoolsdirectory.eq.edu.au/.
  40. ArcGIS, 2016, https://www.arcgis.com/features/index.html.
  41. U. Toft, P. Erbs-Maibing, and C. Glümer, “Identifying fast-food restaurants using a central register as a measure of the food environment,” Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, vol. 39, no. 8, pp. 864–869, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. S. C. Lucan, A. Karpyn, and S. Sherman, “Storing empty calories and chronic disease risk: snack-food products, nutritive content, and manufacturers in Philadelphia corner stores,” Journal of Urban Health, vol. 87, no. 3, pp. 394–409, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. J. M. Poti, M. A. Mendez, S. W. Ng, and B. M. Popkin, “Is the degree of food processing and convenience linked with the nutritional quality of foods purchased by US households?” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 6, pp. 1251–1262, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. H. Gebauer and M. N. Laska, “Convenience stores surrounding urban schools: an assessment of healthy food availability, advertising and product placement,” Journal of Urban Health, vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 616–622, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. L. N. Oliver, N. Schuurman, and A. W. Hall, “Comparing circular and network buffers to examine the influence of land use on walking for leisure and errands,” International Journal of Health Geographics, vol. 6, no. 41, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  46. L. Vaughan, L. Schubert, S. Brignano, and I. Manu-Sione, “What does a multicultural health worker workforce bring to a culturally competent program?” in Population Health Congress, Hobart, Australia, September 2015.
  47. Change4Life Convenience Stores Evaluation Report: Promoting the purchase of fresh fruit and vegetables in deprived areas, Department of Health, London, UK, 2010.
  48. J. Adams, J. Halligan, D. B. Watson et al., “The change4life convenience store programme to increase retail access to fresh fruit and vegetables: a mixed methods process evaluation,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 6, Article ID e39431, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. V. Inglis, K. Ball, and D. Crawford, “Why do women of low socioeconomic status have poorer dietary behaviours than women of higher socioeconomic status? A qualitative exploration,” Appetite, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 334–343, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. L. Schäfer Elinder and M. Jansson, “Obesogenic environments—aspects on measurement and indicators,” Public Health Nutrition, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 307–315, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. M. Caraher, E. O'Keefe, S. Lloyd, and T. Madelin, “The planning system and fast food outlets in London: lessons for health promotion practice,” Revista Portuguesa de Saude Publica, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 49–57, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. C. Mills, “Planning law and public health at an impasse in Australia: the need for targeted law reforms to improve local food environments to reduce overweight and obesity,” Journal of Law and Medicine, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 179–187, 2014. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. R. Engler-Stringer, J. Schaefer, and T. Ridalls, “An examination of the roles played by early adolescent children in interactions with their local food environment,” Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 107, supplement 1, pp. eS48–eS52, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. R. C. Sadler, A. F. Clark, P. Wilk, C. O’Connor, and J. A. Gilliland, “Using GPS and activity tracking to reveal the influence of adolescents’ food environment exposure on junk food purchasing,” Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 107, supplement 1, pp. eS14–eS20, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. H. Oaken, L. Vaughan, N. Fa'avale, and L. Schubert, “Charting availability of processed and unprocessed foods in school neighbourhood nutrition environments in Logan,” in Population Health Congress, Hobart, Australia, September 2015.