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Research Article
Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2018, Article ID 1901429, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1901429
Letter to the Editor

Comment on “Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water and Evaluation of Potential Health Risks of Long-Term Exposure in Nigeria”

1European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Truro, Cornwall, UK
2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to James Grellier; ku.ca.retexe@reillerg.j

Received 12 September 2017; Accepted 17 January 2018; Published 20 February 2018

Academic Editor: Pam R. Factor-Litvak

Copyright © 2018 James Grellier. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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