Journal of Food Biochemistry
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Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision85 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore6.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.660
Impact Factor4.0

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 Journal profile

Journal of Food Biochemistry publishes original research and review articles on the effects of handling, storage, and processing on the biochemical aspects of food tissues, systems, and bioactive compounds in the diet. 

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Dr Rotimi Aluko is Professor of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences at the University of Manitoba and the director of the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals. He is Canada Research Chair in Bioactive Peptides and also focuses on food protein structure and function.

 Special Issues

We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

Latest Articles

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Research Article

Retama raetam Extract for Testicular Health in Type 2 Diabetic Rats: Insight View on the Steroidogenesis, Antioxidants, and Molecular Docking Scores of Bioactive Compounds against Bax

The exponential growth of obesity rates is a pressing issue, as it is now firmly established as a primary driver behind the development of metabolic disorders. Natural products are crucial in drug discovery, prompting an increasing need for further research on bioactive compounds to understand molecular and pharmacological mechanisms and expand available clinical treatments for various diseases. We set out to investigate the therapeutic potential of Retama raetam (RR) extract, a natural compound, in alleviating testicular degeneration and improving sperm quality and quantity in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus. An eight-week high-fat diet (HFD) was administered to type 2 diabetic rats, and then a modest dose of 35 mg/kg of STZ was injected intraperitoneally. The experiment planned to assess the influence of RR extract on the steroidogenesis pathway. For twelve weeks, the rats were given medications orally. The testicular degeneration caused by HFD/STZ is shown by decreasing the accessory sexual glands while reducing the quality of sperm characters and testosterone levels with significantly increased pad fat and leptin levels. Furthermore, administration of RR extract effectively counteracted HFD/STZ-induced oxidation through enhancing the antioxidant status of the testicular tissue through significantly increased SOD and GSH accompanied by decreasing MDA. HFD/STZ rats showed decreased expression of CYP17, STAR, 3βHSD, and BCL2 genes, along with increased BAX gene expression. However, treatment with RR in HFD/STZ rats led to decreased BAX expression and increased expression of CYP17, STAR, 3βHSD, and BCL2 genes, indicating a restoration of gene expression values similar to the control group. The binding site of Bax showed a strong affinity for several bioactive compounds found in R. raetam. The findings from this study suggest that Retama raetam (RR) has the potential as a therapeutic adjunct for managing complications related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These findings afford credence to the idea that RR can be useful in treating infertility associated with type 2 diabetes.

Research Article

The Effect of Free and Encapsulated Casein Hydrolyzates on the Oxidation Rate and Structural Properties of Mayonnaise

Casein is known as a source of bioactive peptides. In this study, the effects of mayonnaise enrichment with casein hydrolyzates on the oxidation process during 6 months were investigated. For this purpose, mayonnaise (≈60% oil) was treated with casein hydrolyzates and encapsulated casein hydrolyzates at concentrations of 100 and 200 ppm and compared with synthetic antioxidants (TBHQ). The results showed that the addition of casein hydrolyzates decreased the oxidation (peroxide, thiobarbituric acid, anisidine, and Totox indices) with a positive dose-response from 100 to 200 ppm. At similar concentrations, samples containing encapsulated casein hydrolyzates performed better than nonencapsulated casein hydrolyzates in retarding the oxidation and were able to compete with TBHQ. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed an improvement in the structure of samples containing encapsulated casein hydrolyzates. Therefore, the use of encapsulated casein hydrolyzates as natural antioxidants is recommended in functional foods and food emulsions such as mayonnaise.

Research Article

The Effect of Chrysin on the Distribution of Extracellular Matrix Proteins around Leydig Cells under Heat Stress Injury

Objective. In the testicular tissue stroma, matrix proteins such as laminin and fibronectin play a critical role in transmitting signals under normal and stressful conditions to Leydig cells. Heat stress is considered one of the stressful conditions in the testicular tissue. This study has investigated the protective effects of chrysin on the distribution of laminin and fibronectin around Leydig cells under heat stress. Methods. Rats were divided into four groups, including sham (A), heat stress (B), heat stress with chrysin treatment (50 mg/kg) (C), and heat stress with chrysin treatment (75 mg/kg) (D). At the end of the treatment period, on the 21st day, testosterone serum levels were evaluated, and the testes were also assessed to determine the changes in gene expression and distribution of laminin, fibronectin, and caspase-3 proteins. Results. Exposure to heat stress in Group B resulted in increased levels of caspase-3, decreased activity, height, and diameter of seminiferous tubules, and altered distribution of laminin and fibronectin proteins around the Leydig cells when compared to the sham group (). Treatment with chrysin 75 resulted in a significant decrease in caspase-3 levels, improved testosterone levels, and increased distribution of laminin and fibronectin around Leydig cells compared to group B (). In addition, the group treated with chrysin 75 showed improved seminiferous histological activity markers in comparison to group B (). Conclusion. Following heat stress, concurrent with disrupted steroidogenesis, an evident change happens in the distribution pattern of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of the testis, which may indicate the transmission of stress signals from the ECM to the Leydig cells. Treatment of chrysin in 75 mg/kg dose can reduce the damage caused by heat stress on the ECM and Leydig cells.

Review Article

Nonenzymatic Browning and Antioxidant Properties of Thermally Treated Cereal Grains and End Products

Thermal treatment can be applied to cereal grains as a pretreatment or processing step in the form of either hydrothermal or dry thermal treatment. These heat treatments result in the occurrence of nonenzymatic browning reactions by means of the Maillard reaction and caramelisation. Nonenzymatic browning is influenced by the type and concentration of sugars and proteins, and the presence of bran. Aside from increasing nonenzymatic browning, thermal treatment increases the antioxidant capacity of cereals and baked goods through the release of bound phenolics. The degree of nonenzymatic browning and antioxidant content in cereal-based products depend on the thermal treatment intensity. Some studies found a decrease in total phenolic content after thermal treatment, due to loss of thermally labile compounds. High-intensity treatment has been shown to produce 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), furfural, and potentially carcinogenic acrylamide. Acrylamide formation can be mitigated by altering the ingredient composition and the degree of thermal treatment. This review discusses the chemistry of nonenzymatic browning reactions, factors influencing the degree of these reactions, and mitigation strategies for acrylamide. An overview of the effect of dry thermal treatment on nonenzymatic browning and antioxidants in wheat and wheat-based products as well as other cereals is provided. Before concluding with perspectives, a discussion of the relationship between nonenzymatic browning and antioxidant properties is presented. This review of the published literature was conducted using two electronic databases and varying combinations of search terms related to the scope of the review.

Research Article

Cyanidin-3-O-Glucoside Combined with PGC1α Inhibitor Promotes Cancer Cell Death by Inducing Excessive Levels of ROS in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Cervical cancer is a global public health problem, particularly in the low-income and middle-income countries. Natural products, such as cyanidin and its derivative cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (C3G), are considered safe and nontoxic food additives, potent therapeutic options for cancer. The present study aims to evaluate the beneficial effects of C3G on cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in vitro and explore more potential therapeutic strategies for CSCC. C3G significantly inhibited the cell growth of CSCC cells and induced cancer cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, C3G promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial mass. The antioxidant regent N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) rescued the effect of C3G on CSCC cells, further demonstrating ROS’s important role in C3G treatment. To explore the underlying mechanism, autophagy-related signaling pathways were investigated, and the results showed that C3G induced cell autophagy but not mitophagy. More importantly, C3G caused a significant activation of mitochondria biogenesis through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) signaling pathway. C3G synergized with PGC-1α inhibitor SR-18292 induced more severe ROS accumulation and showed more potent inhibition of cell proliferation and mitochondrial membrane potential than C3G treatment alone. Thus, the present study suggests a new potential therapeutic strategy for CSCC based on the synergistic effect of C3G and PGC1α inhibitors.

Research Article

Salidroside Alleviates Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion by Balancing Mitochondrial Homeostasis via Nrf2

Salidroside (SAL), a phenylpropanoid glycoside compound mainly from Rhodiola rosea, showed potential effects on myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MIRI) in our previous studies. The primary objective of this investigation was to study the mechanism by which SAL preserves mitochondrial homeostasis in order to provide protection against MIRI. The impact of SAL on the hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced H9c2 cells was detected by using CCK-8, LDH, and AST. The number, function, and morphology of mitochondria were examined by TEM, RT-qPCR, and western blot. The binding ability between SAL and Nrf2 was explored through molecular docking and the cell thermal shift assay. Combined with the Nrf2 inhibitor ML385, our results demonstrated that SAL promotes mitochondrial protection by activating Nrf2, decreasing oxidative stress, and altering the AMPK/PGC-1α/PPARα pathway. In addition, SAL elevates ATP levels and improves mitochondrial dynamics imbalance by inducing both autophagy and mitophagy. These findings highlight the potential therapeutic benefits of SAL for cardiac health and the mitigation of MIRI.

Journal of Food Biochemistry
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision85 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore6.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.660
Impact Factor4.0
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