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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 1 (2010), Issue 3, Pages 399-414
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.1.3.399
Research Article

Two Case Studies Using Mock-Ups for Planning Adult and Neonatal Intensive Care Facilities

Sue Hignett,1 Jun Lu,2 and Mike Fray1

1Department of Ergonomics, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK
2Department of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, UK

Copyright © 2010 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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