Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2010 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 1 |Article ID 862962 | 31 pages | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.1.3.367

Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healing environment of care” can be an effective family integration model. This paper presents evidence showing how environmental design may affect families in ICUs, and proposes design recommendations for creating a healing environment of care promoting family integration in ICUs.

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