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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2, Issue 2, Pages 197-222
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.2.2.197
Research Article

Simulation Modeling of a Check-in and Medication Reconciliation Ambulatory Clinic Kiosk

Blake Lesselroth,1,2 William Eisenhauer,1 Shawn Adams,1,2 David A. Dorr,2 Christine Randall,1 Paulette Channon,1 Kas Adams,1 Victoria Church,1 Robert Felder,1 and David Douglas1

1Oregon Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Drive, Portland, Oregon, 97239, USA
2Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon, 97239, USA

Received 1 August 2010; Accepted 1 January 2011

Copyright © 2011 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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