Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2012 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 3 |Article ID 137517 | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.3.1.87

Heinz-Theo Lübbers, Astrid L. Kruse, Joachim A. Obwegeser, Gerold Eyrich, "Oblique High Resolution Tomography: The Ideal Plane for Visualization of the Gonial Section of the Mandibular Canal and its Related Structures?", Journal of Healthcare Engineering, vol. 3, Article ID 137517, 18 pages, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.3.1.87

Oblique High Resolution Tomography: The Ideal Plane for Visualization of the Gonial Section of the Mandibular Canal and its Related Structures?

Abstract

A new radiologic technique is introduced in this paper for reducing the risk of nerve damage as a result of surgical removal of the mandibular third molar (wisdom tooth). The gonial part of the mandibular canal is obliquely scanned with tomograms on a plane parallel to this part of the mandibular canal. This procedure can be performed with the patient either prone or supine. The scans obtained cover a much longer section of the canal than the axial or coronal plane. Therefore, the scan provides more precise information on the spatial relationship between the mandibular canal and the surrounding structures with fewer images and, therefore, a lower radiation dose. Through such oblique plane scanning, metal artifacts from dental restorations do not impair visualization of the mandibular canal. Clinical cases demonstrating the advantages of this new technique are presented.

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Copyright © 2012 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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