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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 621-648
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.3.4.621
Research Article

Quality Improvement in Hospitals: Identifying and Understanding Behaviors

Lukasz M. Mazur,1 John K. McCreery,2 and Shi-Jie (Gary) Chen3

1Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, NC, USA
2Poole College of Management, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
3Industrial and Systems Engineering, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USA

Received 1 November 2011; Accepted 1 September 2012

Copyright © 2012 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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