Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 605-620
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.3.4.605
Research Article

Reduction of Hospital Physicians' Workflow Interruptions: A Controlled Unit-Based Intervention Study

Matthias Weigl,1 Severin Hornung,2 Jürgen Glaser,1,3 and Peter Angerer4

1Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social, and Environmental, Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany
2Department of Management and Marketing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
3Institute of Psychology, University of Innsbruck, Austria
4Institute for Occupational and Social Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany

Received 1 November 2011; Accepted 1 July 2012

Copyright © 2012 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [10 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • Johanna I. Westbrook, “Interruptions to Clinical Work: How Frequent Is Too Frequent?,” Journal of Graduate Medical Education, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 337–339, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Matthias Weigl, Florian Hoffmann, Andreas Müller, Nina Barth, and Peter Angerer, “Hospital paediatricians’ workflow interruptions, performance, and care quality: a unit-based controlled intervention,” European Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 173, no. 5, pp. 637–645, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • S. R. Walter, L. Li, W. T. M. Dunsmuir, and J. I. Westbrook, “Managing competing demands through task-switching and multitasking: a multi-setting observational study of 200 clinicians over 1000 hours,” BMJ Quality & Safety, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 231–241, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Matthias Weigl, Andreas Müller, Peter Angerer, and Florian Hoffmann, “Workflow interruptions and mental workload in hospital pediatricians: an observational study,” BMC Health Services Research, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 433, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Magdalena Z Raban, Scott R Walter, Heather E Douglas, Dana Strumpman, John Mackenzie, and Johanna I Westbrook, “Measuring the relationship between interruptions, multitasking and prescribing errors in an emergency department: a study protocol: Table 1,” BMJ Open, vol. 5, no. 10, pp. e009076, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Bo M. Havermans, Johannes R. Anema, Allard J. van der Beek, Roosmarijn M. C. Schelvis, Cécile R. L. Boot, and Evelien P. M. Brouwers, “Process variables in organizational stress management intervention evaluation research: A systematic review,” Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 371–381, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Joshua W. Joseph, Victor Novack, Matthew L. Wong, Larry A. Nathanson, and Leon D. Sanchez, “Do Slow and Steady Residents Win the Race? Modeling the Effects of Peak and Overall Resident Productivity in the Emergency Department,” The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Maree Johnson, Gabrielle Weidemann, Rebecca Adams, Elizabeth Manias, Tracy Levett-Jones, Vicki Aguilar, and Bronwyn Everett, “Predictability of Interruptions During Medication Administration With Related Behavioral Management Strategies,” Journal of Nursing Care Quality, pp. 1, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Tara McCurdie, Penelope Sanderson, and Leanne M. Aitken, “Traditions of research into interruptions in healthcare: A conceptual review,” International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 66, pp. 23–36, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Tara McCurdie, Leanne M. Aitken, and Penelope Sanderson, “Applying social network analysis to the examination of interruptions in healthcare,” Applied Ergonomics, vol. 67, pp. 50–60, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar