Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 4, Issue 4, Pages 555-576
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.4.555
Research Article

Measurement of Lower Limb Joint Kinematics using Inertial Sensors During Stair Ascent and Descent in Healthy Older Adults and Stroke Survivors

Annemarie Laudanski,1 Brenda Brouwer,2 and Qingguo Li1

1Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Canada
2School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada

Received 1 May 2013; Accepted 1 September 2013

Copyright © 2013 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J. K. Startzell, D. A. Owens, L. M. Mulfinger, and P. R. Cavanagh, “Stair negotiation in older people/: A review,” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 567–580, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  2. M. Oh-Park, S. Perera, and J. Verghese, “Clinically meaningful change in stair negotiation performance in older adults,” Gait & posture, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 532–5366, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  3. A. Protopapadaki, W. I. Drechsler, M. C. Cramp, F. J. Coutts, and O. M. Scott, “Hip, knee, ankle kinematics and kinetics during stair ascent and descent in healthy young individuals,” Clinical Biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 203–210, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  4. S. Nadeau, B. McFadyen, and F. Malouin, “Frontal and sagittal plane analyses of the stair climbing task in healthy adults aged over 40 years: what are the challenges compared to level walking?” Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 950–959, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  5. A. C. Novak, Q. Li, S. Yang, and B. Brouwer, “Mechanical energy transfers across lower limb segments during stair ascent and descent in young and healthy older adults,” Gait & posture, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 384–390, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  6. A. C. Novak, Biomechanical and physical requirements of stair negotiation with respect to aging and stroke [Ph.D. dissertation], Queen's University, 2011.
  7. L. L. Ploutz-Snyder, T. Manini, R. J. Ploutz-Snyder, and D. a Wolf, “Functionally relevant thresholds of quadriceps femoris strength,” The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 144–152, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  8. G. J. Salem, M. Y. Wang, J. T. Young, M. Marion, and G. a. Greendale, “Knee strength and lower- and higher-intensity functional performance in older adults.,” Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 1679–1684, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  9. J. Perry, M. Garrett, J. K. Gronley, and S. J. Mulroy, “Classification of Walking Handicap in the Stroke Population,” Stroke, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 982–989, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  10. S. E. Lord, K. McPherson, H. K. McNaughton, L. Rochester, and M. Weatherall, “Community ambulation after stroke: how important and obtainable is it and what measures appear predictive?” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 85, no. 2, pp. 234–239, 2004. View at Google Scholar
  11. R. B. Guralnik, J. M. Simonsick, E. M. Ferrucci et al., “A Short physical performance battery assessing lower extremity function: association with self-reported disability and prediction of mortality and nursing home admission,” Journal of Gerontology, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 85–94, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  12. C. Bonnyaud, R. Zory, D. Pradon, N. Vuillerme, and N. Roche, “Clinical and biomechanical factors which predict Timed Up and Down Stairs test performance in hemiparetic patients,” Gait & posture, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 466–470, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  13. M. Alzahrani, C. Dean, and L. Ada, “Relationship between walking performance and types of community-based activities in people with stroke: an observational study,” Revista brasileira de fisioterapia (São Carlos (São Paulo, Brazil), vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 45–51, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  14. M. A. Alzahrani, C. M. Dean, and L. Ada, “Ability to negotiate stairs predicts free-living physical activity in community-dwelling people with stroke: an observational study,” The Australian journal of physiotherapy, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 277–281, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  15. M. Thorngren, B. Westling, and B. Norrving, “Outcome after stroke in patients discharged to independent living,” Stroke, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 236–240, 1990. View at Google Scholar
  16. A. G. Cutti, A. Ferrari, P. Garofalo, M. Raggi, A. Cappello, and A. Ferrari, “‘Outwalk’: a protocol for clinical gait analysis based on inertial and magnetic sensors.,” Medical & biological engineering & computing, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 17–25, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  17. H. M. Schepers, H. F. J. M. Koopman, and P. H. Veltink, “Ambulatory assessment of ankle and foot dynamics,” IEEE transactions on bio-medical engineering, vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 895–902, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  18. H. Martin Schepers, E. H. F. van Asseldonk, C. T. M. Baten, and P. H. Veltink, “Ambulatory estimation of foot placement during walking using inertial sensors,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 43, no. 16, pp. 3138–3143, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  19. D. Roetenberg, Inertial and Magnetic Sensing of Human Motion [Ph.D. disertation], Univeristy of Twente, 2006.
  20. A. M. Sabatini, “Quaternion-based extended Kalman filter for determining orientation by inertial and magnetic sensing,” IEEE transactions on bio-medical engineering, vol. 53, no. 7, pp. 1346–1356, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  21. T. Liu, Y. Inoue, K. Shibata, K. Shiojima, and J. Bin Yin, “A Novel Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis System,” Advanced Materials Research, vol. 569, pp. 352–355, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  22. S. Lambrecht, I. Jonkers, and J. L. Pons, Converging Clinical and Engineering Research on Neurorehabilitation, vol. 1, Springer, 2013.
  23. K. J. O'Donovan, R. Kamnik, D. T. O'Keeffe, and G. M. Lyons, “An inertial and magnetic sensor based technique for joint angle measurement,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 40, no. 12, pp. 2604–2611, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  24. P. Picerno, A. Cereatti, and A. Cappozzo, “Joint kinematics estimate using wearable inertial and magnetic sensing modules,” Gait & posture, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 588–595, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  25. H. Zhou, H. Hu, and N. Harris, “Application of wearable inertial sensors in stroke rehabilitation,” Conference Proceedings/IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, vol. 4, pp. 6825–6828, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  26. J. C. van den Noort, A. Ferrari, A. G. Cutti, J. G. Becher, and J. Harlaar, “Gait analysis in children with cerebral palsy via inertial and magnetic sensors,” Medical & biological & engineering & computing, vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 377–386, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  27. S. Yang, J.-T. Zhang, A. C. Novak, B. Brouwer, and Q. Li, “Estimation of spatio-temporal parameters for post-stroke hemiparetic gait using inertial sensors,” Gait & posture, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 354–358, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  28. A. S. Anna, N. Wickstrom, R. Zugner, and R. Tranberg, “A wearable gait analysis system using inertial sensors Part I/: Evaluation of measures of gait symmetry and normality against 3D kinematic data,” Biosignals, pp. 180–188, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  29. A. Ferrari, A. G. Cutti, P. Garofalo et al., “First in vivo assessment of ‘Outwalk’: a novel protocol for clinical gait analysis based on inertial and magnetic sensors.,” Medical & biological & engineering & computing, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 1–15, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  30. G. Yavuzer, O. Oken, A. Elhan, and H. J. Stam, “Repeatability of lower limb three-dimensional kinematics in patients with stroke,” Gait & posture, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 31–35, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  31. A. C. Novak, The effect of botulinum toxin a (BTX-A) on gait in chronic stroke [MA. Sc. thesis], Queen's University, 2007.
  32. A. C. Novak and B. Brouwer, “Kinematic and Kinetic Evaluation of the Stance Phase of Stair Ambulation in Persons with Stroke and Healthy Adults: A Pilot Study,” Journal of applied biomechanics, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 443–452, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  33. T. Cloete and C. Scheffer, “Repeatability of an off-the-shelf, full body inertial motion capture system during clinical gait analysis,” in Conference proceedings/IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference, pp. 5125–128, 2010.
  34. D. Roetenberg, H. Luinge, and P. Slycke, “Xsens MVN/: Full 6DOF Human Motion Tracking Using Miniature Inertial Sensors,” Xsens Technologies white paper, pp. 1–7, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  35. A. C. Novak and B. Brouwer, “Sagittal and frontal lower limb joint moments during stair ascent and descent in young and older adults,” Gait & posture, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 54–60, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  36. B. Brouwer, K. Parvataneni, and S. J. Olney, “A comparison of gait biomechanics and metabolic requirements of overground and treadmill walking in people with stroke,” Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 729–734, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  37. D. A. Winter, Biomechanics and Motor Control of Human Movement, Wiley, 2009.
  38. M. P. Kadaba, H. K. Ramakrishnan, M. E. Wootten, J. Gainey, G. Gorton, and G. V. Cochran, “Repeatability of kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data in normal adult gait,” Journal of orthopaedic research, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 849–60, 1989. View at Google Scholar
  39. A. Ferrari, A. G. Cutti, and A. Cappello, “A new formulation of the coefficient of multiple correlation to assess the similarity of waveforms measured synchronously by different motion analysis protocols,” Gait & posture, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 540–542, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  40. P. Garofalo, A. G. Cutti, M. V. Filippi et al., “Interoperator reliability and prediction bands of a novel protocol to measure the coordinated movements of shoulder-girdle and humerus in clinical settings,” Medical & biological & engineering & computing, vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 475–486, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  41. J. Røislien, O. Skare, a. Opheim, and L. Rennie, “Evaluating the properties of the coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC) for kinematic gait data,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 45, no. 11, pp. 2014–2018, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  42. A. Brennan, K. Deluzio, and Q. Li, “Assessment of anatomical frame variation effect on joint angles: A linear perturbation approach.,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 44, no. 16, pp. 2838–2842, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  43. Moving forward after a stroke, The Johns Hopkins medical letter health after 50, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 4–5, 2006.
  44. D. J. Gladstone, C. J. Danells, and S. E. Black, “The Fugl-Meyer Assessment of Motor Recovery after Stroke: A Critical Review of Its Measurement Properties,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 232–240, 2002. View at Google Scholar
  45. B. J. McFadyen and D. a. Winter, “An integrated biomechanical analysis of normal stair ascent and descent,” Journal of biomechanics, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 733–744, 1988. View at Google Scholar