Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2013 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 4 |Article ID 632925 | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.2.203

Philip J. Peyton, "Pulmonary Carbon Dioxide Elimination for Cardiac Output Monitoring in Peri-operative and Critical Care Patients: History and Current Status", Journal of Healthcare Engineering, vol. 4, Article ID 632925, 20 pages, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.2.203

Pulmonary Carbon Dioxide Elimination for Cardiac Output Monitoring in Peri-operative and Critical Care Patients: History and Current Status

Received01 Sep 2012
Accepted01 Dec 2012

Abstract

Minimally invasive measurement of cardiac output as a central component of advanced haemodynamic monitoring has been increasingly recognised as a potential means of improving perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing major surgery. Methods based upon pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination are among the oldest techniques in this field, with comparable accuracy and precision to other techniques. Modern adaptations of these techniques suitable for use in the perioperative and critical are environment are based on the differential Fick approach, and include the partial carbon dioxide rebreathing method. The accuracy and precision of this approach to cardiac output measurement has been shown to be similar to other minimally invasive techniques. This paper reviews the underlying principles and evolution of the method, and future directions including recent adaptations designed to deliver continuous breath-by-breath monitoring of cardiac output.

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