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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 1-22
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.1.1
Research Article

Progress in Molecular Imaging in Endoscopy and Endomicroscopy for Cancer Imaging

Supang Khondee1,3 and Thomas D. Wang1,2

1Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Phayao, Thailand

Received 1 July 2012; Accepted 1 November 2012

Copyright © 2013 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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