Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2015 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 6 |Article ID 320284 | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.6.1.41

Valter Silva, Antonio Grande, Cassiano Rech, Maria Peccin, "Geoprocessing via Google Maps for Assessing Obesogenic Built Environments Related to Physical Activity and Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases: Validity and Reliability", Journal of Healthcare Engineering, vol. 6, Article ID 320284, 14 pages, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.6.1.41

Geoprocessing via Google Maps for Assessing Obesogenic Built Environments Related to Physical Activity and Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases: Validity and Reliability

Received01 Oct 2014
Accepted01 Nov 2014

Abstract

This study analyzes the reliability and validity of obesogenic built environments related to physical activity and chronic noncommunicable diseases through Google Maps in a heterogeneous urban area (i.e., residential and commercial, very poor and very rich) in São Paulo (SP), Brazil. There are no important differences when comparing virtual measures with street audit. Based on Kappa statistic, respectively for validity and reliability, 78% and 80% of outcomes were classified as nearly perfect agreement or substantial agreement. Virtual measures of geoprocessing via Google Maps provided high validity and reliability for assessing built environments.

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Copyright © 2015 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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