Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2015 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 6 |Article ID 813170 | 14 pages | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.6.1.71

Review of Information and Communication Technology Devices for Monitoring Functional and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials

Received01 Jul 2014
Accepted01 Dec 2014

Abstract

Detecting and monitoring early cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a significant need in the field of AD therapeutics. Successful AD clinical trial designs have to overcome challenges related to the subtle nature of early cognitive changes. Continuous unobtrusive assessments using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices to capture markers of intra-individual change over time to assess cognitive and functional disability therefore offers significant benefits. We review the literature and provide an overview on randomized clinical trials in AD that use intelligent systems to monitor functional decline, as well as strengths, weaknesses, and future directions for the use of ICTs in a new generation of AD clinical trials.

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