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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 6 (2015), Issue 2, Pages 179-192
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.6.2.179
Research Article

Backrest Shape Affects Head–Neck Alignment and Seated Pressure

Atsuki Ukita,1,2 Shigeo Nishimura,3 Hirotoshi Kishigami,4 and Tatsuo Hatta4

1Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
2Department of Occupational Therapy, Hokuto Hospital, Obihiro, Japan
3Division of Rehabilitation Engineering, Counseling Office, Hokkaido Government, Sapporo, Japan
4Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

Received 1 January 2015; Accepted 1 March 2015

Copyright © 2015 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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