Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9840273, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9840273
Research Article

The Efficacy of a Haptic-Enhanced Virtual Reality System for Precision Grasp Acquisition in Stroke Rehabilitation

1School of Information Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai City, China
2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan and National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
4Blue Marble Game Ltd., Los Angeles, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Si-Huei Lee; moc.liamg@ieuhiseel

Received 2 June 2017; Revised 18 August 2017; Accepted 20 September 2017; Published 5 November 2017

Academic Editor: Yi-Hung Liu

Copyright © 2017 Shih-Ching Yeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. W. Rosamond, K. Flegal, K. Furie et al., “Heart disease and stroke statistics—2008 update: a report from the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee,” Circulation, vol. 117, no. 4, pp. e25–146, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. G. Kwakkel, B. J. Kollen, J. van der Grond, and A. J. Prevo, “Probability of regaining dexterity in the flaccid upper limb: impact of severity of paresis and time since onset in acute stroke,” Stroke, vol. 34, pp. 2181–2186, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. M. Feys, W. J. De Weerdt, B. E. Selz et al., “Effect of a therapeutic intervention for the hemiplegic upper limb in the acute phase after stroke: a single-blind, randomized, controlled multicenter trial,” Stroke, vol. 29, pp. 785–792, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. T. S. Olsen, “Arm and leg paresis as outcome predictors in stroke rehabilitation,” Stroke, vol. 21, pp. 247–251, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. V. M. Parker, D. T. Wade, and R. Langton Hewer, “Loss of arm function after stroke: measurement, frequency, and recovery,” International Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 69–73, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. D. T. Wade, R. Langton-Hewer, V. A. Wood, C. E. Skilbeck, and H. M. Ismail, “The hemiplegic arm after stroke: measurement and recovery,” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, vol. 46, pp. 521–524, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. G. Bard and G. G. Hirschberg, “Recovery of voluntary motion in upper extremity following hemiplegia,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 46, pp. 567–572, 1965. View at Google Scholar
  8. T. E. Twitchell, “The restoration of motor function following hemiplegia in man,” Brain, vol. 74, pp. 443–480, 1951. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. I. Faria-Fortini, S. M. Michaelsen, J. G. Cassiano, and L. F. Teixeira-Salmela, “Upper extremity function in stroke subjects: relationships between the international classification of functioning, disability, and health domains,” Journal of Hand Therapy, vol. 24, pp. 257–264, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. J. M. Blennerhassett, L. M. Carey, and T. A. Matyas, “Grip force regulation during pinch grip lifts under somatosensory guidance: comparison between people with stroke and healthy controls,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 87, pp. 418–429, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. M. Blennerhassett, T. A. Matyas, and L. M. Carey, “Impaired discrimination of surface friction contributes to pinch grip deficit after stroke,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 21, pp. 263–272, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. H. You, S. H. Jang, Y. H. Kim et al., “Virtual reality–induced cortical reorganization and associated locomotor recovery in chronic stroke: an experimenter-blind randomized study,” Stroke, vol. 36, pp. 1166–1171, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. H. Jang, S. H. You, M. Hallett et al., “Cortical reorganization and associated functional motor recovery after virtual reality in patients with chronic stroke: an experimenter-blind preliminary study,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 86, no. 11, pp. 2218–2223, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. E. J. Plautz, G. W. Milliken, and R. J. Nudo, “Effects of repetitive motor training on movement representations in adult squirrel monkeys: role of use versus learning,” Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 74, pp. 27–55, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. L. Nelson, K. Konosky, K. Fleharty et al., “The effects of an occupationally embedded exercise on bilaterally assisted supination in persons with hemiplegia,” American Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 50, pp. 639–646, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. S. V. Adamovich, G. G. Fluet, A. Mathai, Q. Qiu, J. Lewis, and A. S. Merians, “Design of a complex virtual reality simulation to train finger motion for persons with hemiparesis: a proof of concept study,” Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 6, no. 1, p. 28, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. V. Adamovich, A. S. Merians, R. Boian et al., “A virtual reality based exercise system for hand rehabilitation post-stroke: transfer to function,” The 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, vol. 7, pp. 4936–4939, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. A. S. Merians, D. Jack, R. Boian et al., “Virtual reality-augmented rehabilitation for patients following stroke,” Physical Therapy, vol. 82, no. 9, pp. 898–915, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. J. Broeren, M. Rydmark, and K. S. Sunnerhagen, “Virtual reality and haptics as a training device for movement rehabilitation after stroke: a single-case study,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 85, no. 8, pp. 1247–1250, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. R. Golomb, B. C. McDonald, S. J. Warden et al., “In-home virtual reality videogame telerehabilitation in adolescents with hemiplegic cerebral palsy,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 1–8.e1, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. S. Cameirao, S. B. Badia, E. D. Oller, and P. F. Verschure, “Neurorehabilitation using the virtual reality based Rehabilitation Gaming System: methodology, design, psychometrics, usability and validation,” Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 7, no. 1, p. 48, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. http://www.novint.com.
  23. M. F. Folstein, S. E. Folstein, and P. R. McHugh, “"Mini-mental state". A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 189–198, 1975. View at Google Scholar
  24. A. R. Fugl-Meyer, L. Jaasko, I. Leyman, S. Olsson, and S. Steglind, “The post-stroke hemiplegic patient. 1. a method for evaluation of physical performance,” Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 13–31, 1975. View at Google Scholar
  25. D. M. Morris, G. Uswatte, J. E. Crago, E. W. Cook 3rd, and E. Taub, “The reliability of the wolf motor function test for assessing upper extremity function after stroke,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 750–755, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. B. Nedelec, K. Dion, J. A. Correa, and J. Desrosiers, “Upper extremity performance test for the elderly (TEMPA): normative data for young adults,” Journal of Hand Therapy, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 31–43, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. J. Desrosiers, G. Bravo, R. Hebert, E. Dutil, and L. Mercier, “Validation of the Box and Block Test as a measure of dexterity of elderly people: reliability, validity, and norms studies,” Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, vol. 75, no. 7, pp. 751–755, 1994. View at Google Scholar
  28. Jamar Dynamometer Lafayette Instrument Company, PO Box 5729, Lafayette, IN 47903.
  29. F. D. Davis, R. P. Bagozzi, and P. R. Warshaw, “User acceptance of computer technology: a comparison of two theoretical models,” Management Science, vol. 35, pp. 982–1003, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  30. V. Venkatesh, “Determinants of perceived ease of use: integrating control, intrinsic motivation, and emotion into the technology acceptance model,” Information Systems Research, vol. 11, pp. 342–365, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  31. K. L. Nowak and F. Biocca, “The effect of the agency and anthropomorphism on users’ sense of telepresence, copresence, and social presence in virtual environments,” Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, vol. 12, pp. 481–494, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. L. Connelly, Y. Jia, M. L. Toro, M. E. Stoykov, R. V. Kenyon, and D. G. Kamper, “A pneumatic glove and immersive virtual reality environment for hand rehabilitative training after stroke,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, vol. 18, no. 5, pp. 551–559, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. D. G. Kamper, R. V. Kenyon, X. Luo, T. Kline, K. Stubblefield, and H. C. Fischer, “Hand rehabilitation following stroke: a pilot study of assisted finger extension training in a virtual environment,” Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1–12, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. G. G. Fluet, A. S. Merians, Q. Qiu et al., “Robots integrated with virtual reality simulations for customized motor training in a person with upper extremity hemiparesis,” Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 79–86, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. A. Merians, E. Tunik, G. Fluet, Q. Qiu, and S. Adamovich, “Innovative approaches to the rehabilitation of upper extremity hemiparesis using virtual environments,” European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 123–133, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  36. A. S. Merians, G. G. Fluet, Q. Qiu et al., “Robotically facilitated virtual rehabilitation of arm transport integrated with finger movement in persons with hemiparesis,” Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 8, no. 1, p. 27, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. N. N. Byl, G. M. Abrams, E. Pitsch et al., “Chronic stroke survivors achieve comparable outcomes following virtual task specific repetitive training guided by a wearable robotic orthosis (UL-EXO7) and actual task specific repetitive training guided by a physical therapist,” Journal of Hand Therapy, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 343–352, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. J. Broeren, M. Rydmark, A. Bjorkdahl, and K. S. Sunnerhagen, “Assessment and training in a 3-dimensional virtual environment with haptics: a report on 5 cases of motor rehabilitation in the chronic stage after stroke,” Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 180–189, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. M. da Silva Cameirão, i. Bermúdez, S. Badia, E. Duarte, and P. F. Verschure, “Virtual reality based rehabilitation speeds up functional recovery of the upper extremities after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study in the acute phase of stroke using the rehabilitation gaming system,” Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 287–298, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus