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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2018, Article ID 2942930, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2942930
Research Article

A Study of the Effects of Daily Physical Activity on Memory and Attention Capacities in College Students

1Department of Information Management, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2Innovation Center for Big Data and Digital Convergence, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
3University of Economics, The University of Danang, Danang, Vietnam
4Department of Surgery & Orthopedics, Keelung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Keelung, Taiwan
5Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
6Department of Neurosurgery, Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City, Taiwan
7Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Chien-Lung Chan; wt.ude.uzy.nrutas@nahclc

Received 11 October 2017; Revised 16 January 2018; Accepted 12 February 2018; Published 22 March 2018

Academic Editor: Yi Su

Copyright © 2018 Dinh-Van Phan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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