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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2018, Article ID 8039075, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8039075
Research Article

A Sorting Statistic with Application in Neurological Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Autism

1Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, NS, Canada B2G 2W5
2Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1 Autumn Street, No. 456, Boston, MA 02215, USA
3Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
4Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to Jacob Levman; ac.xfts@namvelj

Received 28 November 2017; Accepted 29 January 2018; Published 29 March 2018

Academic Editor: Feng-Huei Lin

Copyright © 2018 Jacob Levman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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