Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2019 / Article / Tab 2

Research Article

Retrospective Analysis of Microbial Colonization Patterns in Central Venous Catheters, 2013–2017

Table 2

Etiology of the CVC colonization and CALBSI episodes.

MicroorganismColonization (n = 379)CALBSI (n = 107)

Gram-positive bacteria, n (%)
S. aureus25 (6.6)14 (13.1)
S. epidermidis43 (11.3)7 (6.5)
S. haemolyticus35 (9.2)7 (6.5)
 Other CoNS31 (8.2)7 (6.5)
Enterococcus8 (2.1)2 (1.9)
Corynebacterium6 (1.6)1 (0.9)
 Others4 (1.1)1 (0.9)
Gram-negative bacteria, n (%)
Acinetobacter75 (19.8)25 (23.4)
Pseudomonas species37 (9.8)12 (11.2)
Klebsiella species14 (3.7)3 (2.8)
Colibacter12 (3.2)3 (2.8)
Enterobacter spp.11 (2.9)5 (4.7)
 Others19 (5.0)
Fungi, n (%)
Candida albicans39 (10.3)13 (12.1)
Candida parapsilosis9 (2.4)5 (4.7)
Candida glabrata6 (1.6)1 (0.9)
 Others5 (1.3)1 (0.9)

CVC, central venous catheter; CLABSI, central line-associated bloodstream infection; CoNS, coagulase-negative staphylococci. The data in the table are presented as n (%), which refer to the number of isolated organism (n) and the percentage of different isolated organisms (%), respectively. The total number of isolated organisms was 379 (18.7%). Gram-negative bacteria with 44.4% were predominate among the total colonization bacteria on the CVC surfaces, followed by Gram-positive bacteria (40.1%) and fungi (15.6%). A total of 107 (5.3%) isolated organisms from CVCs were associated with a diagnosis of CLABSI. The most common organisms in causing CLABSI were Acinetobacter (23.4%), S. aureus (13.1%), and Candida albicans (12.1%).

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