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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2007, Article ID 76396, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/76396
Clinical Study

Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Major Depression: Effect of Sertraline Therapy

1Department of Psychiatry, Gülhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara 06018, Turkey
2Division of Internal Medicine, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul 34668, Turkey
3Department of Immunology, Gülhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara 06018, Turkey
4Department of Monitoring and Evaluation, Turkish Ministry of Health, Ankara 06570, Turkey
5Department of Internal Medicine, Gülhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara 06018, Turkey

Received 23 June 2007; Revised 28 September 2007; Accepted 28 November 2007

Academic Editor: Ethan M. Shevach

Copyright © 2007 Levent Sutcigil et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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