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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2007, Article ID 83671, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/83671
Review Article

Blurring Borders: Innate Immunity with Adaptive Features

1Department of Immunology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs 7624, Hungary
2Laboratory of Comparative Neuroimmunology, Department of Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1763, USA

Received 26 June 2007; Accepted 5 November 2007

Academic Editor: Yasunobu Yoshikai

Copyright © 2007 K. Kvell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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