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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2008, Article ID 790309, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/790309
Research Article

Aflatoxin-Related Immune Dysfunction in Health and in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

1Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35226, USA
2St. Markus Hospital and AIDS ALLY, Kumasi, Ghana
3Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA
4Department of Biochemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
5College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
6College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 30223, USA

Received 18 March 2008; Accepted 28 May 2008

Academic Editor: Yang Liu

Copyright © 2008 Yi Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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