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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 139304, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/139304
Review Article

Harnessing the Effect of Adoptively Transferred Tumor-Reactive T Cells on Endogenous (Host-Derived) Antitumor Immunity

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA
2The Immunology Program, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

Received 18 June 2010; Accepted 5 August 2010

Academic Editor: Kurt Blaser

Copyright © 2010 Yolanda Nesbeth and Jose R. Conejo-Garcia. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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