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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 260267, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/260267
Review Article

Focus on Adoptive T Cell Transfer Trials in Melanoma

1Ella Institute of Melanoma, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer 52621, Israel
2Sheba Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer 52621, Israel
3Department of Human Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

Received 29 July 2010; Accepted 8 November 2010

Academic Editor: Charles R. Rinaldo

Copyright © 2010 Liat Hershkovitz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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