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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 516768, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/516768
Review Article

Regulation of Tumor Immunity by Tumor/Dendritic Cell Fusions

1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 277-8567, Japan
2Institute of Clinical Medicine and Research, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 277-8567, Japan
3Department of Oncology, Institute of DNA Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-8461, Japan
4Saitama Cancer Center Research Institute for Clinical Oncology, Saitama 362-0806, Japan
5Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA

Received 29 May 2010; Accepted 22 September 2010

Academic Editor: E. Shevach

Copyright © 2010 Shigeo Koido et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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