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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 539519, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/539519
Review Article

Tumor Antigen Cross-Presentation and the Dendritic Cell: Where it All Begins?

1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
2National Centre for Asbestos Related Diseases, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
3School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, WA 6150, Australia

Received 2 July 2010; Accepted 25 August 2010

Academic Editor: Dennis Klinman

Copyright © 2010 Alison M. McDonnell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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