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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 565643, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/565643
Review Article

Gene Carriers and Transfection Systems Used in the Recombination of Dendritic Cells for Effective Cancer Immunotherapy

1Institute of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China
2Department of Biomaterials, Field of Tissue Engineering, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawanara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan
3Department of Biotechnology and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Received 1 July 2010; Accepted 28 October 2010

Academic Editor: Robert E. Cone

Copyright © 2010 Yu-Zhe Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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