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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2011, Article ID 347594, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/347594
Review Article

Innate Immune Effectors in Mycobacterial Infection

1Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
2WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Received 4 October 2010; Revised 13 December 2010; Accepted 22 December 2010

Academic Editor: Carl Feng

Copyright © 2011 Hiroyuki Saiga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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