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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 353510, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/353510
Review Article

Lymph Node Transplantation and Its Immunological Significance in Animal Models

Institute of Functional and Applied Anatomy, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany

Received 13 January 2011; Accepted 22 March 2011

Academic Editor: K. Blaser

Copyright © 2011 Manuela Buettner and Ulrike Bode. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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