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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 405310, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/405310
Review Article

Innate Immune Recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Department of Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre and Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Geert Grooteplein Zuid 8, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Received 25 December 2010; Accepted 29 January 2011

Academic Editor: Taro Kawai

Copyright © 2011 Johanneke Kleinnijenhuis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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