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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2011, Article ID 768542, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/768542
Review Article

Tuberculosis Immunity: Opportunities from Studies with Cattle

1National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA 50010, USA
2Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
3Departments of Veterinary Population Medicine and Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108, USA
4Molecular Biology and Molecular Virology, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
5Animal Bioscience Centre, Teagasc, Grange, BT55&GE Co. Meath, Ireland
6Livestock Diseases Programme, Institute for Animal Health, Compton, Near Newbury RG20 7NN, UK
7Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-1070, USA

Received 2 September 2010; Revised 28 September 2010; Accepted 11 October 2010

Academic Editor: Carl Feng

Copyright © 2011 W. Ray Waters et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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