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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 152546, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/152546
Research Article

Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Differ in Their Ability to Induce Respiratory Burst and Apoptosis in Neutrophils as a Possible Mechanism of Immune Escape

1IMEX-CONICET-ANM, Academia Nacional de Medicina, 1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Servicio de Micobacterias, Hospital Malbrán, Pacheco de Melo 3081, 1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Received 4 April 2012; Accepted 29 April 2012

Academic Editor: Eyad Elkord

Copyright © 2012 María M. Romero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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