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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 397648, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/397648
Review Article

Immunotherapy Using Dendritic Cells against Multiple Myeloma: How to Improve?

1Research Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun, Jeollanamdo 519-763, Republic of Korea
2Department of Hematology-Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, 160 Seoyangro, Hwasun, Jeollanamdo 519-763, Republic of Korea
3Vaxcell-Bio Therapeutics, Hwasun, Jeollanamdo 519-763, Republic of Korea

Received 4 November 2011; Accepted 2 January 2012

Academic Editor: Qing Yi

Copyright © 2012 Thanh-Nhan Nguyen-Pham et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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