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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 791392, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/791392
Review Article

The Role of Airway Epithelial Cells in Response to Mycobacteria Infection

1Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for the Conservation and Utilization of Special Biological Resources of Western China, Ningxia University, Yinchuan, Ningxia 750021, China
2College of Life Science, Ningxia University, Yinchuan, Ningxia 750021, China

Received 31 December 2011; Accepted 15 February 2012

Academic Editor: S. Sozzani

Copyright © 2012 Yong Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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