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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 913426, 9 pages
Research Article

Gestational Medication Use, Birth Conditions, and Early Postnatal Exposures for Childhood Asthma

1Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
2Department of Family Medicine, Taipei City Hospital, Zhong Xing Branch, Taipei 103, Taiwan

Received 30 June 2011; Revised 19 September 2011; Accepted 25 October 2011

Academic Editor: Huey-Jen Su

Copyright © 2012 Yang-Ching Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Our aim is to explore (1) whether gestational medication use, mode of delivery, and early postnatal exposure correlate with childhood asthma, (2) the dose responsiveness of such exposure, and (3) their links to early- and late-onset asthma. We conducted a matched case-control study based on the Taiwan Children Health Study, which was a nationwide survey that recruited 12-to-14-year-old school children in 14 communities. 579 mothers of the participants were interviewed by telephone. Exclusive breastfeeding protected children from asthma. Notably, childhood asthma was significantly associated with maternal medication use during pregnancy, vacuum use during vaginal delivery, recurrent respiratory tract infections, hospitalization, main caregiver cared for other children, and early daycare attendance. Exposure to these factors led to dose responsiveness in relationships to asthma. Most of the exposures revealed a greater impact on early-onset asthma, except for vacuum use and daycare attendance.