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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 150835, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/150835
Review Article

Molecular Pathogenesis of B-Cell Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder: What Do We Know So Far?

1KU Leuven, Translational Cell and Tissue Research, Leuven, Belgium
2UZ Leuven, Department of Hematology, University Hospitals KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
3UZ Leuven, Department of Pathology, University Hospitals KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Received 7 January 2013; Revised 10 March 2013; Accepted 11 March 2013

Academic Editor: Nima Rezaei

Copyright © 2013 J. Morscio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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