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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 186420, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/186420
Research Article

Ex Vivo Restimulation of Human PBMC Expands a T Cell Population That Can Confound the Evaluation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Vaccination

1R&D Division, CSL Limited, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
2Influenza R&D Division, bioCSL Pty., Ltd., 63 Poplar Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 22 July 2013; Accepted 24 July 2013

Academic Editor: K. Blaser

Copyright © 2013 B. J. Sedgmen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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