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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 274019, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/274019
Review Article

The Leech Nervous System: A Valuable Model to Study the Microglia Involvement in Regenerative Processes

Lille 1 University, Fundamental and Applied Biology and Mass Spectrometry, FABMS-PRISM, Microglial Activation Group, IFR 147, SN3, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France

Received 9 April 2013; Accepted 7 June 2013

Academic Editor: Anirban Ghosh

Copyright © 2013 Françoise Le Marrec-Croq et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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