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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 473706, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/473706
Review Article

Evidence for Prion-Like Mechanisms in Several Neurodegenerative Diseases: Potential Implications for Immunotherapy

1Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E3
2Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E5
3School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E5

Received 28 March 2013; Revised 11 June 2013; Accepted 2 July 2013

Academic Editor: Thierry Vincent

Copyright © 2013 Kristen Marciniuk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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