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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 541259, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/541259
Review Article

The Role of the Immune System in Huntington’s Disease

1Department of Neurology, St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
2International Graduate School of Neuroscience, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
3Department of Neurology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany

Received 3 April 2013; Accepted 19 June 2013

Academic Editor: Dan Frenkel

Copyright © 2013 Gisa Ellrichmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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