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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 939786, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/939786
Review Article

The Role of the Innate Immune System in Alzheimer’s Disease and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: An Eye on Microglia

Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy

Received 4 April 2013; Accepted 4 July 2013

Academic Editor: Dan Frenkel

Copyright © 2013 Elisa Ridolfi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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