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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 986789, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/986789
Review Article

Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, University of Florida, P.O. Box 110700, Museum Road Building 981, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA

Received 3 September 2013; Revised 13 November 2013; Accepted 20 November 2013

Academic Editor: Luca Gattinoni

Copyright © 2013 Simone Kennedy Bedoya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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