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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 103780, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/103780
Review Article

Potential Benefits of Therapeutic Use of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Neuroprotection and Parkinson’s Disease

1Theralogics, Inc., 1829 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27514-5861, USA
2School of Dentistry, University of Alberta, 7020 Katz Group Centre, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R3
3North Carolina Oral Health Institute, School of Dentistry, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Manning Dr. & Columbia Street, Campus Box 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450, USA

Received 29 June 2013; Revised 3 December 2013; Accepted 4 December 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editor: David Kaplan

Copyright © 2014 Lynda Peterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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