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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 401903, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/401903
Research Article

Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Drives Proliferation of Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Possible Novel Therapeutic Target

1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035, China
2Department of Rheumatology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510630, China
3Department of Rheumatology of Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong 528400, China

Received 2 December 2013; Revised 28 January 2014; Accepted 31 January 2014; Published 6 March 2014

Academic Editor: Y. Yoshikai

Copyright © 2014 Mingxia Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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