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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 483960, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/483960
Review Article

Complement System in Pathogenesis of AMD: Dual Player in Degeneration and Protection of Retinal Tissue

1Department of General Pathology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland
2Department of Ophthalmology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland
3Department of Histology and Embryology, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powstancow Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland

Received 28 April 2014; Revised 18 July 2014; Accepted 1 August 2014; Published 4 September 2014

Academic Editor: Xiao-Feng Yang

Copyright © 2014 Milosz P. Kawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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