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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 615130, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/615130
Editorial

Pathophysiological Roles of Cytokine-Chemokine Immune Network

1Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Immune-Network Pioneer Research Center, Dong-A University, 32 Daesin-gongwon-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 602-714, Republic of Korea
2Department of Molecular Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402, Japan
3Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 50 Samduk-2ga, Jun-gu, Daegu 700-721, Republic of Korea
4Cardiovascular Biology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 N.E. 13th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA
5Institute for Experimental Medicine, Inflammatory Carcinogenesis, UK S-H, Kiel Campus, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Building 17, 24105 Kiel, Germany

Received 5 August 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 11 September 2014

Copyright © 2014 Jong-Young Kwak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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