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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 628289, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/628289
Review Article

The New Insight into the Role of Antimicrobial Proteins-Alarmins in the Immunopathogenesis of Psoriasis

1Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, ul. Chalubinskiego 1, 50-368 Wroclaw, Poland
2Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Thalkirchner Straße 48, 80539 Munich, Germany

Received 1 February 2014; Revised 11 April 2014; Accepted 12 April 2014; Published 8 May 2014

Academic Editor: April Armstrong

Copyright © 2014 A. Batycka-Baran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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