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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 789069, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/789069
Review Article

The “Trojan Horse” Approach to Tumor Immunotherapy: Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

1School of Biomedical Sciences, CHIRI Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
2National Centre for Asbestos Related Diseases, UWA School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, QEII Medical Centre, Perth, WA, Australia

Received 21 February 2014; Accepted 9 April 2014; Published 18 May 2014

Academic Editor: Eyad Elkord

Copyright © 2014 Delia Nelson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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