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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 923135, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/923135
Research Article

Polarization of ILC2s in Peripheral Blood Might Contribute to Immunosuppressive Microenvironment in Patients with Gastric Cancer

1Department of Immunology, School of Medical Science and Laboratory Medicine, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Zhenjiang 212013, China
2Institute of Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212001, China

Received 1 November 2013; Revised 26 January 2014; Accepted 27 January 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editor: Hans W. Nijman

Copyright © 2014 Qingli Bie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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