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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 960252, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/960252
Review Article

T Cell and Other Immune Cells Crosstalk in Cellular Immunity

Bone Marrow Transplantation Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003, China

Received 10 July 2013; Revised 15 January 2014; Accepted 29 January 2014; Published 6 March 2014

Academic Editor: Catherine Bollard

Copyright © 2014 Ying He et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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